Can Water Be Stored On Concrete?

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Can Water Be Stored On Concrete?

Postby Aaron » Mon Jun 27, 2011 10:58 am

Jonathan and I are looking for any actual research done one storing water on concrete. Fact or fiction and why?

Please provide links to any research on the topic.
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Re: Can Water Be Stored On Concrete?

Postby rugrash » Mon Jun 27, 2011 7:42 pm

Sounds like a good topic for Mythbusters to tackle.

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Re: Can Water Be Stored On Concrete?

Postby JBGecko13 » Mon Jun 27, 2011 9:56 pm

rugrash wrote:Sounds like a good topic for Mythbusters to tackle.

Rug


I second this, and maybe we should do our own study. I keep my bottles on the floor or in the basement so I will find a way to test mine after fixed intervals.
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Re: Can Water Be Stored On Concrete?

Postby Aaron » Tue Jun 28, 2011 10:54 am

If you contact a local University they may be able to help with the testing. Who knows, you could find a grad-student to do their Thesis on it and share it with us. Food for thought.
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Re: Can Water Be Stored On Concrete?

Postby Godcopp » Thu Jun 30, 2011 8:02 pm

I have a 750 gallon well cistern made of concrete. One of most valuable preps I have. Many large cisterns are made of concrete, I couldn't even begin to dream up an excuse why you can't store water in it (or on it). I think that is a myth busted. I think the water on concrete myth comes from the same place the car battery on concrete comes from... http://msgboard.snopes.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=20;t=000695;p=1
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Re: Can Water Be Stored On Concrete?

Postby Sammy » Tue Aug 02, 2011 10:12 pm

I avoid storing things on concrete to avoid condensation, which can lead to mold and rust. Neither of these should be problematic for plastic bottles themselves, but I'd still store them with an airspace. The condensation could leach minerals out of the concrete that could damage the plastic (I can't verify that this actually happens). Either way, I avoid plastic anyway. And yes, most water bearing infrastructure is concrete; water simply exposed to concrete doesn't go bad.
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Re: Can Water Be Stored On Concrete?

Postby will2power » Tue Nov 08, 2011 8:13 am

I'll again mention the obvious, that concrete water tanks are very common and there is obviously no health risk from these. I drank out of one for 18 years until I moved into the City. My grandmother drank out of concrete water tanks for 72 years before she moved into a retirement village. She is now over 90.

There can be transfer (or leeching) problems with concrete because it is a porous material and there are always provisions such as polymer DPC used when a building (for example) is in contact with a concrete water tank.

However: The water is stored inside the bottle, The PET is no different to a DPC (moisture barrier). What people are proposing is that 'chemicals' (though no-one will say which chemicals) are able to pass through this barrier which is obviously air and water tight.
In this case you store the bottles on what? Are the bottles not going to leech chemicals from these surfaces also. In this way the concrete is a mute point, unless the chemicals that are 'in' this concrete that we make WATER TANKS out of is worse than synthetic carpet or the vast array of other suggestions you'll find on the net.

I've researched and researched, spoken to University Lecturers and I can't find ANY reliable source of information on the matter.
I constantly come across somebody who says "The LA Fire website said:"
Find this person at: http://faculty.deanza.edu/donahuemary/S ... earthquake

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http://lafd.org/fire-prevention/119-fir ... saster-kit
and, surprise surprise it says nothing of it.

Lastly: If you look on the internet you'll find a million and one studies that says that drinking our of PET is pretty bad for you. So utube preppers are more than happy to recommend storing water in PET when there are literally hundreds of scientific peer reviewed documents that say that you'll get chemicals from the bottle. But then warn you about storing it on concrete.

I would love to know the etymology of this madness...
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Re: Can Water Be Stored On Concrete?

Postby Aaron » Tue Nov 08, 2011 8:36 am

will2power wrote:I would love to know the etymology of this madness...


Me too. In one of the links Techboss posted, the author mentioned something about the myth coming from storing water in plastic bottles in an environment over a certain temperature. It went on to say that the chemicals came from the plastic alone and not the concrete. I have not had time check up on this.
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Re: Can Water Be Stored On Concrete?

Postby GrtWhytHype » Wed Nov 09, 2011 12:47 pm

I think it's a generalized statement for a specific instance. There are multiple ways to mix concrete for certain purposes. The concrete pavers that are used for parks aren't mixed the same way the floor of your basement is.

Certain elements are included in the mixtures to increase strength, decrease the time spent mixing, influence setting times etc. sometimes these elements can be garbage or refuse. (usually used as fillers) I'm looking for the article I found that explains this and when I do I'll post.

My assumption is that these poor quality concretes are the one's you wouldn't want to permeate your bottles.
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Re: Can Water Be Stored On Concrete?

Postby Ilustrisimo » Wed Nov 16, 2011 2:20 pm

I don't understand how this thread has more replies than the other ones that aren't focused around discussion of old wives tales.

If you are concerned about this.-----> Get a pallet or buy a slab of plywood.------> Put water on it -----> Stop worrying
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